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Translation Help with 1825 Divorce Document

Translation Help with 1825 Divorce Document

Inlagd: 21 maj 2013 23.27 GMT
Klassificering: Fråga
Hi --

After much searching, I have uncovered the divorce papers of my ancestors, Sven Cantzoff and Eva Ekbom, who were married in 1802 in Solna, Stockholm, and divorced sometime in 1825.

Sven Cantzoff is a family mystery; there is no record of him prior to about 1800 in Stockholm. He gives his birth year as 1764 and 1767, so, clearly, he's in his thirties by the time he seems to begin to exist!

My hope is that, besides learning the facts of their marriage and divorce, these documents will help uncover more information about Sven Cantzoff (I know a bit about his wife, Eva Ekbom).

I am attaching the church record pertaining to the divorce (received from the Archives in Stockholm). The court records document is very lengthy and seems to have much more detailed information -- but I couldn't ask anyone to translate all of that; it is about 20 handwritten pages. It will me and a dictionary, perhaps!

If there is trouble reading the file, please alert me. It is in 2 separate pages; this all I have (the Archive did not send my any link to the originals or reference info.) I have to post each page separately.

And thank you so very much for any help. I am very excited about this piece of the family puzzle and am grateful for all the generous help I have already received.

Thank you --

Meredith
Bilagor:

Re: Translation Help with 1825 Divorce Document

Inlagd: 21 maj 2013 23.28 GMT
Klassificering: Fråga
And this is the second page of the church divorce document:
Bilagor:

Re: Translation Help with 1825 Divorce Document

Inlagd: 22 maj 2013 00.28 GMT
Klassificering: Fråga
Uttalandet
8.12
Till följe av 16 Cap. 6 § kyrkolagen verkställdes den genom Stockholms Norra Förstads Westra Kämnärsrätt den 14 förlidne Augusti ådömda äktenskapsskillnaden emellan förre SkräddareGesällen Swen Cantzoff och dess hustru Ewa Cantzoff, hvilken med SkomakareGesällen Magnell horsbrott begått; och förklarades nu dessa makar frie, ledige och löse ifrån hvarandre , mannen till ingående af annat Giftermål, när och hvarhälst honom sjelf godt synes och ??? råd föreligger, med iakttagande af hvad 12 Cap. 2 § GiftermålsBalken föreskrifver, men hustrun förbjöds att det göra/

To do justice to the document I've translated in a very hard-to-follow style...the Swedish version is worse and makes me thankful I spent part of an otherwise misspent youth studying law...

The Pronouncement
8.12
According to Chapter 16 § 6 of the Church Law was executed the divorce adjudged through the Stockholm Northern Suburb West Chamber court on the 14th last August between former Journeyman Tailor Swen Cantzoff and its wife Ewa Cantzoff, who with Journeyman Shoemaker Magnell has committed adultery; and these spouses were now declared free, available and loose from each other, the man to enter on another Marriage, when and wherever seems good to him and ??? advice is present, observing what in Chapter 12 § 2 of the Marriage Act is prescribed, but the wife was forbidden to do it/

Ingela

Re: Translation Help with 1825 Divorce Document

Inlagd: 22 maj 2013 00.46 GMT
Klassificering: Fråga
göra/ någonsin med sin lägersman SkomakareGesällen, Magnell, eller i öfrigt förr än hennes nu frånskilljda man antingen död eller gift är, eller dertill samtycker och konungen i nåder gifver ther lof till.

it/ ever with her seducer the Journeyman Shoemaker, Magnell, or otherwise before her now divorced husband either dead or married is, or thereto agrees and the king in his mercy gives permission to.

Sooo...the cuckolded husband is free to marry within six months (he's treated like a widower), but the erring wife cannot marry - neither her lover nor anyone else - unless her former husband has married or died (interesting that they put it the other way round…) or (perhaps not so likely) agrees to let her marry and the king gives his permission (since it’s "the king" and not "H.M. the King" it really means the county governor, or rather an official in his office).

Very sorry, no personal details...

Ingela

Re: Translation Help with 1825 Divorce Document

Inlagd: 22 maj 2013 00.52 GMT
Klassificering: Fråga
Hi Ingela!

Thank you so much -- I have your lovely reply to my last query about my great-grandfather, Karl Emil Hjelte, and his Merchant Marine exploits, sitting in my inbox, still awaiting my own response. I told my mother what you had said about the term of endearment "little sugargrain," it being an old-style form, but the translation was accurate! (I feel even more a voyeuse reading that letter now; thankfully, it is the only "love letter" that we have. The rest are domestic and sisterly notes between Granny and her family back in Stockholm).

I appreciate your translation of this church record; I can tell that any further clues are going to be in the hefty court record which is about 20 pages. I will have to piece it all apart...I studied literature in my own semi-misspent youth and then taught at a university in Washington, DC before I had my children (who are both under age 5). So I do have some training in translation and deciphering old documents, but just not in Swedish. And the handwriting gets me every time!

I am curious about this Shoemaker Magnell...I know a bit about Eva; she was in and out of prison for drunkenness, once for stealing, once for begging -- and I knew the divorce was based on her infidelity. They also had to send two of their children to the orphanage for a year at a time -- twice -- because of their poverty. A hard, hard life.

Still no real clue about Sven Cantzoff, but I will forge ahead. To connect it for you, if interested, Sven Cantzoff is the "little sugargrain"'s (Karl Emil's wife) great-grandfather. Sven had Arvid who had Christina Olivia who had Marta Viktoria: voila!

Again, thank you so much for your kindness -- and your generosity with your time. The images of life in Sweden that you painted in previous posts have given color to my family's past. I may call upon your for your lawyerly help with the court documents, if you have the patience!

Take care --
Meredith

Re: Translation Help with 1825 Divorce Document

Inlagd: 22 maj 2013 15.24 GMT
Klassificering: Fråga
Hi Meredith,

"Lilla sockersmulan" is definitely a term of endearment, but perhaps not a very serious one...don't think you should view yourself as a voyeuse just because of something as innocent as all that... ;-))

Court records are usually a very good source, because they didn't do things half way in those days. It's common for court records to have a page or so of family background. But perhaps there's more focus on Eva, since she was the guilty party...by rights she should even have gone to jail (as should Magnell) since adultery was a real, punishable crime until 1864.

Why don't you take the court records apart and publish only a page at a time? Translating one page is quite manageable, and even if every single page takes a day or two it would probably be quicker than if you tried it yourself. Particularly since it is of course written with the very "free" spelling they practised at the time, which makes it difficult to look up words. Also, some words are obsolete and some have quite a different meaning today.

I've read your posts on the Finnish forum, and could add a little about how guilds worked. You applied to a guild as an apprentice. The application had to have an excerpt from the birth records in the parish were you were born, showing that you were legitimate (born in wedlock or betrothal). For this you paid a fee. You then paid a master for the privilege of becoming an apprentice; you lived with the master and his family (food and lodging for doing apprentice work) and were over a number of years (usually four, shorter e.g. for a shoemaker) given increasingly more difficult tasks. After the set number of years (didn't matter if you were a genius at the craft, you still had to
do your years - "pay your dues") you made - on your own, without the master helping you - a special piece of work, a journeyman's piece. When this was approved by the guild, you were a journeyman and could be employed by either your old master or by any other master (usually you stayed with your old master a year or two before moving on). As a journeyman, you did just that - journeyed. This was to pick up new techniques, fashions etc. Your journeys could take you anywhere in Europe; Swedish journeymen were found in all Swedish towns but also in Denmark, England and, above all, Germany. Few went to France or Italy because of the hassle with religion (though at the Swedish regiment in France - Royal Suédois - it was a case of "don't ask don't tell"...). After you had been a journeyman for a good many years, you did your master piece and if this was approved you had the right to establish yourself as a master and accept journeymen and apprentices. However, setting up as a master required approval from the guild elders, who regulated how many masters were allowed in a particular town or city (a popular way of achieving this was to wed the widow of a master, "preserving the widow", and thereby take over the position).
Please note that before the major legal changes of 1846/1864 it was illegal to establish yourself as a craftsman outside a town or city, unless you were a tailor, shoemaker or smith not belonging to a guild and being appointed by a parish council to work in that particular parish. Craftsmen who weren't up to town standards or who had tired of waiting for an opportunity to establish their own business would become "parish craftsmen".

A journeyman didn't work for board and lodging but for wages - quite good ones if he was competent, had worked for a number of years and worked for a master with a good reputation (=many customers). Journeymen were allowed to set up house for themselves, and marry. Journeymen were definitely not paupers - though they weren't rich of course. A "normal" journeyman would live in a couple of rooms, have food on the table and maybe even a single maid. But this did take a thrifty wife, not a wife more interested in other men and partying.

About the orphanage "Allmänna barnhuset": it wasn't free to place a child there, and from the late 1700's children were kept there as short a time as possible before they were placed with foster-parents (already two centuries ago it was realized that children were better off in a proper family in the countryside than at an institution in the city). This is of course also what the records say: "uppfostras af" - raised by "bonden" (the farmer) Anders Andersson in Borgsjö parish in Medelpad [province]. I therefore doubt that it was due to poverty the children were placed at the orphanage (there was such a thing as pauper support by the parish, but the children wouldn't have been placed at the orphanage just because of that), but a man employed full-time couldn't look after children...since his wife wasn't to be trusted and indeed wasn't there after the divorce (he may have wanted to remove the children from an unsuitable environment before the divorce - I haven't checked the dates). "Poverty" comes into it only in the way that this journeyman tailor didn't seem to be able to afford a nanny.
Men always kept the children after a divorce.

Ingela

Re: Translation Help with 1825 Divorce Document

Inlagd: 22 maj 2013 20.39 GMT
Klassificering: Fråga
Hi Ingela –

You suggest a good plan: parceling out a page or two of the court record for help with translation. I am sure that the translation itself would be easy (if a little drenched in pomposity!)…but only if one did not have to deal with the creative spelling and the archaic handwriting. It is then, as it would seem to me, a difficult task; I am fortunate to have found such generous help on this message board. I never would have thought people so interested and willing to share their expertise with a stranger (though, to be fair, a stranger who is a compatriot in the genealogical adventure).

I will post a few pages (I received it as a PDF, so have to transfer it into a Word or .jpg) on the general board and cross my fingers that someone has the patience!

Yes: the Finnish search. It was suggested to me – and I can tell myself – that Cantzoff is not originally a Swedish name. It transmuted into Kantzow by the 1850’s (and there were Kantzows in Stockholm at that time, but – as far as I am able to tell – they are not related and were of a higher social class), but the original seems to be Cantzoff or Cantzov. I’ve done some research in Finnish records online to no avail as of yet. Sven seems to spring from the ground in his mid-thirties to be recorded in Storkyrkan parish tax rolls in early 1800. He’s an apprentice at the time and that’s why I’ve been trying the guild angle.

From what you explain, getting hold of Sven’s guild application/documents would provide firm clues to his origin. Thank you so much for your discussion of what he had to do to become a member…It helps give more “shape” to his experience and character, and how he and his family lived. I had a hazy image of a small, dingy room, children in rags, etc., etc. That Sven was a professional and could/perhaps did make a decent income explains – maybe – why Eva Ekbom married him. I had wondered why a relatively young girl (she was 22) would marry a 38 year old man and this information, combined with the fact that their first son was born about 6 months after their marriage, clarifies things. Again, perhaps!

I had no idea about the orphanage; I assumed that the children were placed there by the city or by a special plea from their parents. Clearly, I am operating with a contemporary mindset. And, clearly, my Swedish pick-and-mix translation efforts miss clues (for example, that the boys were placed with Anders Andersson). Since Eva was a regular “visitor” in the prison on Langenholmen, she obviously wasn’t taking care of the children and Sven may not have wanted her to. Their last child, Carl, who died in infancy, was born in 1814, and I suspect that’s when things began to go downhill.

Sven is becoming more and more of a compelling character to me…What a life. Of his 6 children, 4 survive infancy, one dies in his twenties, one ends up in and out of the Sabbatsburg poorhouse, his 1 daughter remains unmarried (though is a fairly successful seamstress, with an apprentice girl of her own) – only Arvid Lorentz, my direct ancestor, seems to flourish. He becomes a cabinetmaker/carpenter and moves to Hernosand, Vasternorrland and raises his family.

I can’t tell you how much I enjoy your discussion! I appreciate the insight into my little family dramas that you provide. There is no way I could have gained the understanding that I believe I am acquiring without your help.

Thank you – and take care –
Meredith
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